Apple Fritters

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When the English first settled in the New World they brought with them apples and began growing trees.  In the early cookery recipe books apples were called pippins. Fritter simply means food fried in a batter. The batter recipes that they brought with them used yeast for the leavening in the batter.  Yeast came from making ale.  The yeast was skimmed off the top of the ale and place in a bottle.  This bottled ale was then used for it’s yeast. So 18th century cookery books would call for ale in batters and bread making.  This was the ale they were talking about, the stuff that was skimmed off the top while the ale was fermenting.  This scum that was on the top contained yeast.

Today we have baking powder to leaven quick bread.  But the recipe is still basically the same that was made during the Colonial period just minus the ale.  It is a simple recipe that takes only a few ingredients.  There is very little sugar in the batter but the fritter can be dusted with powdered sugar or cinnamon sugar after frying. Sugar was a luxury food in the Colonies. This recipe yields about 18 fritters. It is a nice change from doughnuts and not expensive to make. This is a special treat when you are out of ideas and money.

Apple Fritters

Ingredients:

Oil for deep frying

  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • 1 tablespoons oil
  • 2 apples peeled, cored and chopped

Directions:

Mix dry ingredients and set aside.  Beat eggs, milk and oil together and set aside.  Heat oil while preparing apples.

Oil should be at heated to 375 degrees.  If you don’t have an electric skillet or deep fryer you can use a heavy pot on the stove with a cooking thermometer to check temperature.

Mix wet and dry ingredients together. Do not over mix because you want your fritters to be soft and tender.  Add chopped apples and coat with mixture.

Use a tablespoon or ice cream scoop to drop batter into hot oil. Fry until golden brown on both sides turning once.  It takes about 5 minutes depending on size of fritters. Remove and drain on wire rack or paper towels.

To finish them off just dust with powered sugar. You can also use granulated sugar mixed with a little cinnamon.

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I save my oil after use by straining the cooled off oil into a jar.  Then I store it in the refrigerator.  I usually use it 3 or 4 times before it breaks down.  If you fry something strong flavored like fish or onion rings you will need to discard it afterwards because  the oil absorbed the flavor. The next time it is used it will pass that flavor to the food.

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25 Comments Add yours

  1. slfinnell says:

    Sounds like a good Sunday treat to surprise the family with tomorrow. Thanks:)

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    1. trkingmomoe says:

      I promise you they won’t last long. Thanks for you comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh my gosh, these look scrumptious! When someone drops a box of donuts on the table in the teacher’s lounge at school, I can usually resist–unless!– there are apple fritters! But I never ever thought of making them at home. what a treat! Thanks for the idea and the encouragement! Hope this finds you in the middle of a fun weekend!

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    1. trkingmomoe says:

      I forget to add that you can glaze them like doughnuts too. I like them with a little powdered sugar because I enjoy the apple flavor. Thanks for your comment.

      Like

      1. I’m sitting at breakfast right now, and am wishing I had one with my mug of tea!

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  3. Well Momoe this looks delicious but too hard for me. No deep frying in my house cuz I’m a klutz but it sure was fun to read and remember. dru

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    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Hmmm….I will have to find you a baked doughnut recipe out of my cookbook collection. I have another salad recipe to post in the next couple of days for you. I have the dressing made for today’s dinner. This dressing keeps for a couple of months in the refrig. I like it for summer salads.

      Thanks for your comments.

      Like

  4. If only I didn’t have to go to the store first to buy apples, I’d be mixing this up instead of commenting so I’ve pinned it for later. 🙂 Looks delicious and I enjoyed the background story.

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    1. trkingmomoe says:

      You can use other fruit for this. Blueberries are a favorite. I have made this with bananas, peaches and a small can of crushed pineapple drained. It is a basic fritter recipe.

      Thanks for stopping in.

      Like

  5. averyclaire says:

    Oh my goodness…I LOVE READING YOUR BLOG. You find the most interesting things. When I was a little girl a lady from my church made these all the time for our festivals. She called them “pom-poms”…even my husband remembered them! I can’t wait to try them…Probably today! Thanks SO MUCH. Love your history to go with it as well…!!! Have a Happy MAY DAY!!!!

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    1. averyclaire says:

      Oh boy. I just made them. It was a blast from the past. I added a cup of plumped golden raisins because that is the way I remember them. My DH and I felt like we were ten years old again!!! TY SO much!!!

      Like

      1. trkingmomoe says:

        Thanks for you comment. They are good and it don’t take long for them to disappear. You can now make them often and yes raisins goes well in them.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. trkingmomoe says:

      When I was researching them, I ran across them being made in Africa and they call them puff puffs. Food is an interesting topic.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. You are talking about one of my favorites. I think I like Apple Fritters more than I like donuts.

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    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Me too. They are easier to make and the family eats them as fast as I make them.

      Like

  7. These look amazing! Thanks for stopping by my blog 🙂

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  8. suth2 says:

    Just the right thing for our Autumn weather. Yum.

    Like

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      It is a nice warm up to the chill in the air. They never last long because you can’t just eat one. Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I love the story of how yeast was collected. Apple fritters are my dad’s favourite, I used to make them for him when I was a teenager.

    Do you know any good on-line sources for accessing old cookery books? So far I have relied on my own small collection but I would love to access older ones. Any tips?

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    1. trkingmomoe says:

      There maybe some at the Library of Congress on line source. Google around because some Universities also have old books that can be accessed with old recipes. Thanks for stopping in . I will look around.

      Like

  10. Connie T says:

    I shared this with my facebook so I can make these later. Sound delicious.

    Like

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thanks for stopping in. Right now I don’t have a print feature on this blog. I haven’t found one yet . I am also on facebook. and post my recipes there. Thanks for stopping in.

      Like

  11. I like the recipes on your blog in addition to quilting!

    Like

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thanks. I have some other needlework that I am going to add to the site. It is a work in progress. Please stop in anytime to chat. The door is always open.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Awesome! It seems like a welcoming site😀

        Like

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