Kitchen Tea Pot and Tea Cup Towels

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I was looking through my fabric stash and found some medium weight organic cotton I had bought several years ago.  It was a markdown from a quilt shop that was going out of business. At the time I was just intrigued with the idea of organic cotton. It was soft as well as having  a good weight to it. The  natural unbleached cream color I could use for anything. It dawned on me that this would be perfect to make kitchen tea towels out of.   It was 60 inches wide, which made it easy to cut 2 towels. A 20 inch cut from the end of the fabric and then cut a along the fold to give me the two towels. I hemmed the  edges on the sewing machine to make the towel 28 inches long by 18 inches wide. I ironed on the transfer pattern from Aunt Martha’s.  I had had this transfer set for about 20 years and had never used it.

The cotton was easy to needle and it didn’t take long to finish both towels.  The next step was to figure out what edging pattern to use.  I have a large box of number 10 crochet cotton to rummage through in my stash.  I chose a variegated pastel colored thread that matched the spring like colors I had chosen for the embroidery floss. The floss was also organic.  I found it at a local hobby shop.  Then I though maybe I should go back and get organic cotton crochet thread.  There I found a pastel varigated number 10 thread.

What I had in mind was little daisies along the bottom of the towels.  I remembered I had a free tutorial pinned to my pininterst board, I have a large collection of vintage crochet patterns that I have used over the years but I find it fun to look through all the youtube and free patterns that are offered on the internet. I often think of my aunts that were avid crocheters would think of what patterns are now being offered.  The patterns that catch my eye are usually from Eastern Europe and I have to use a translator for them and use the pictures as a guide. The terminology doesn’t match up with what is used in the US.  This is the case on this easy little tutorial.

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I used cream colored cotton thread for the header and the variegated thread for the flowers. I sewed the edging on the towel by hand on both ends.

You can see more pictures of the towels at my Etsy shop.

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18 Comments Add yours

  1. Just darling but really should be framed instead of used. ~~dru~~

    Liked by 2 people

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      You just gave me an idea for another blog. I have several framed needlework pictures I have done over the last 50 years, These towels are for sale in my etsy store. I have 3 more I am working on for the store.

      Like

  2. karenlee says:

    I had the same thought: frame those. They are adorable. I would hate to use them for anything but display. I have quite a few pieces done by my great grandma and her daughter, my grandma. I think framing is the answer for mine. Thanks for showing us these delightful pieces of history.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. trkingmomoe says:

    Thanks for your comment. I enjoy making these.

    Like

  4. suth2 says:

    Far too beautiful to use as towels. Do tray cloths still get used? I could see them being used as tray cloths if the edging was on both ends.
    Your embroidery work is lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      They are 28 inches long so they could be used as a table runner. Thanks for your comment.

      Like

  5. quilt32 says:

    These are wonderful – such lovely work.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thank you. I find it relaxing to embroider.

      Like

  6. They are beautiful! My great-aunts and great-grandmother put crocheted edging on many items — I never knew that it was worked separately and then sewn on! I always thought they must punch little holes into the edge of the cloth and then crochet from there, but it seemed like it would ravel… I never figured it out. So time-consuming but such a lovely finishing touch!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Actually some people do punch their crochet hook through the fabric. I don’t like to do that. Old linens you can see a hemstitched machine finish that had the holes punch out that you could crochet in. Today I don’t see that in needlework kits. It usually has a pearl edge on the item. I think the reason for that is so many people no longer know how to thread crochet. What I sometimes do is a blanket stitch with the crochet cotton using a large needle, then I can crochet in that thread edge. It looks like you crocheted it directly into the fabric.

      Thanks for your comment.

      Like

      1. Well, in the unlikely event that I do take up crocheting edgings (which I would like to do, but honestly, if I haven’t learned how by this point in my life…), I will definitely attach them your way. I think that makes the most sense.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. KerryCan says:

    I love the vintage look you achieve with these–they are so authentic looking! Your Etsy shop looks very nice, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thanks I have a lot of work to do on the shop.

      Like

  8. slfinnell says:

    I must confess. I’m one of those hole punchers 😉 Beautiful embroidery!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thank you. It all depends on how we like to work. It was one of the ways I was taught 50 years ago and now I find it easier on the hands to sew it on.

      Like

  9. So cute! I inherited unfinished embroidered quilt squares from my mom. Your project reminds me so much of my mom’s quilt squares. I also remember stitching with the stamped designs when I was a child.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Sheryl says:

    Beautiful! The crocheted daisies bring back warm memories.They are very similar to some that were on the edging of a pillowcase that I had when I was a child.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. That is beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

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