Apple Custard Pie

This year I had major surgery and it has taken a while for me to recover. I missed posting during this period. To start back posting I took a close look at my site’s traffic during this absence. I am so grateful to everyone that has visited my site and shared my recipes because the traffic has never dropped off. This food blog is now 10 years old and so much has changed since I started sharing my recipes. Currently we are facing food shortages and high inflation.

While I was recovering from my illness, I watched many videos and read many blogs and the trend has been showing off prepping hauls of food. That is great if you have the money and space to store it. Not all of us can do that. My daughter was great taking me grocery shopping while I could not drive so I did do some prepping. The way I have approached this was to just buy basic ingredients needed to make meals and baking. I did some research going through my collection of cook books to find some simple and hearty recipes.

I am going to share a fruit pie recipe that was published in the late 1930’s by the New England Yankee Cookbook. The story behind this pie was included with the recipe explains it was from a grandmother. The author was told from her grandmother that this pie was made in her youth by girls to show off to boys that was courting them. The pie is made from common simple ingredients that caught my interest. I also found the background story was interesting.

There is more to this pie’s history, it is a simplified depression era recipe of the historical Marlboro Pie that was named for the England town that it originated.  The pie recipe was brought to New England by the early settlers.  There are many versions of this pie over it’s history.  Majority of them have butter added to the filling but this recipe does not.  During the Depression and WWII, home cooks had to make due with what they could get or had on hand. 

I made this recipe and used a 8 inch pie pan.  Since this recipe was for a 9 inch pie,  I drained the applesauce in a fine mesh strainer and that gave me 1 cup of applesauce.  Applesauce would have most likely home made and have less water then what the commercial canned applesauce we have today. The extra liquid might make the pie weep after it is cut.   I also only used 1 cup of milk because my pie is smaller.  The pie has a mild apple flavor and a custard texture.   I enjoyed it and plan to make it again.   It is a good recipe to have on hand when you are out of money and out of ideas for meals. 

Apple Custard Pie

  • Servings: 8 servings
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • Recipe for one crust pie shell
  • 1 1/2 cups drained through sieve applesauce
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3 eggs beaten
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk

Directions:

Preheat oven 450 degrees.

Make pie crust from your favorite recipe in a 9 inch pie pan. In a mixing bowel beat eggs with sugar. Add applesauce, cinnamon, salt and milk. Mix on slow speed. Pour into uncooked pie shell. Cover edges with a shield or foil. Bake for 10 minutes at 450 degrees. Reduce heat to 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool completely.

Note* For a 8 inch pie use only 1 cup of drained applesauce and I cup of milk. The sugar can be a scant half a cup.

14 Comments Add yours

  1. Helen says:

    Hope you’re on the mend 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Glad you’re feeling better!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thank you so much.

      Like

  3. It looks like a lovely recipe! I hope you are feeling better, and it is good to see your post! Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      I am doing fine and taking my time catching up. Thanks for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Glad to see you posting again. Silly question – Could you make this without a crust, like your coconut custard pie? I am always on the lookout for things that can be done gluten free for when my daughter visits. Here’s to good health!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      You could put 2 or 3 tablespoons of cornstarch in it. Butter your pie plate well before pouring in the filling. It should hold together after it is chilled to slice. I have used cornstarch in impossible apple pie as a sub for bisquick or flour. I keep my cornstarch in a tin so I can’t check to see if it has wheat flour mixed in it. Rice flour would work well also.

      I just edited the recipe and put 2 tablespoons of cornstarch so you can print this out. It is added insurance for those who try the recipe. That way the applesauce doesn’t weep after it is cut.

      That was a good question. Thanks for the comment

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Sounds delicious, and a good way to use up eggs! I’m glad to see you posting again.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thanks. I wasn’t going to post until spring but I have a collection of recipes that I should share made from basic pantry ingredients. What I noticed in my stats for the last year, was the traffic coming from Pinterest passing around my simple scratch recipes. There is nothing on my Pinterest pages that is eye catching compared to other pages Food is getting expensive. This is just a hobby I fell into. So it is satisfying to see a recipe for peach pie I posted years ago made from 2 cans of sliced peaches go viral in the last 2 years. There are several other recipes that caught the interest of cooks that was in my archives.

      Like

  6. I’m saving this one, I have never heard of it before. I bet it tastes amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      I am going to edit the recipe and add 2 tablespoons of cornstarch to keep the applesauce from weeping as added insurance. Applesauce can hold a lot of moisture. Thanks for stopping in.

      Edit* You may of heard it called Applesauce Pie.

      Like

  7. Welcome back! Sending you thoughts of continued healing and thanks for sharing the recipe 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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