Crockpot Express Pressure Cooked Turkey Bone Broth

A simple and time efficient way of making stock or broth from the carcass of roasted turkey. I purchased a new pressure cooker, a Crockpot Express Pot, this year in the pre Black Friday sales on line at a deep discount and was excited to use it.  It was a real treat to buy something new for myself.  My old pressure cooker was a hand me down from my mother-in-law handle broke and I could not find the right size of rubber ring for it.  The old pressure cooker was a small stove top type that she had used for a long time and was no longer usable for pressure cooking.

I had never made broth or stock in that small pressure cooker so this was the first time I had done this.  Normally after I roast a turkey, that night, I would carve all the meat off of it and put the carcase back into the roasting pan that still had all left over juices in it and simmer for several hours to make the stock. I would end up staying up very late after I was worn out from cooking the holiday meal, to baby sit the simmering pot.

It came the day before Thanksgiving.  I unpacked it and watched some videos.  It came with a little cookbook and a operation manual.  The great news was it could hold the turkey carcass and I could use it on the Thanksgiving turkey.  I washed up the lid and liner so I would be ready.

The instructions and recipe was for poultry broth using uncooked bones and meat. It included onion. celery and carrots. It recommended one hour cooking time under pressure.  I already had cooked bones so that seem excessive cook time.

The broth will keep in the refrigerator for 3 days so you can make soup.  Or you can freeze chilled broth to use at a much later date for cooking.  This batch made a little more than 3 quarts of rich broth.

Crockpot Express Pressure Cooked Turkey Bone Broth

  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  1. Take time to deglaze the roasting pan with a couple of cups of water.  This will be saved for the pressure cooker. (optional step)
  2. After all the meat is carved off the turkey, break up the carcass so it will fit into the automatic pressure cooker.
  3. If the carcass fills up the pot you can leave out the whole carrots, celery and onion to flavor the stock.  You want to leave room for liquid.
  4. Pour the deglazed liquid into the pot and add enough water up almost to the fill line in the pot. The deglazed liquid can also contain left over cooking juices.  Don’t add pepper because it becomes too strong under pressure and ruin the taste.  The deglazed liquid has enough seasoning in it from the roasting so nothing is needed.
  5. Follow instruction for using the pressure cooker.  Set the time for 40 minutes.  The carcass bones are already cooked so you do not need one hour cooking time.
  6. After the pressure has gone down and the lid can be removed.  Turn off cooker and let it cool for safe handling.  It is really hot when you take the lid off.  Wait at least 30 minutes before you strain the liquid. The liquid will keep for 3 days in the refrigerator.  The chilled liquid can be frozen up to several months to be used later.

I used the automatic setting for soup and just set the time up 40 minutes. I was pleased with the broth after I strained it.

14 Comments Add yours

  1. Tatjana Ostojic says:

    Never made a turkey bone broth so I am very eager to try this! Happy Thanksgiving!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      It is old school. Every time my mother would roast a chicken or turkey she would make soup broth from the carcass after the meat was taken off. A small amount of meat was save mostly small pieces and that was put in the strained broth to then make soup.

      I hope you enjoyed your Thanksgiving. Thanks for your comment. .

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Tatjana Ostojic says:

    Thank you for the tips! In the part of the world where I live, we rarely use turkey for a broth. I live in eastern Europe. We are more chicken/beef oriented. I loved your recipe and I will surely try it soon. Hope you had a great time as well!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Turkey is a traditional holiday meal for Thanksgiving and Christmas in North America, This includes Canada because they also celebrate Thanksgiving a few weeks earlier than us. They go on sale just before those two holidays so I always buy an extra one for the freezer to enjoy in early spring. .I am looking forward to your recipes.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. This is fantastic! We spent Thanksgiving with family and they sent us home with the carcass. Will be making stock out of it today and I never thought of using a pressure cooker. I freeze the broth in muffin tins, then transfer to gallon freezer bags. Makes using them over the next several months very easy. Love the post!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. trkingmomoe says:

          Thanks.

          I froze mine in quart bags and added some chopped turkey to each one for soup. The broth came out almost like a rich consomme. Usually when I make it on the stove top it isn’t as concentrated even if I cook it for several hours. Using the muffin tins is a good idea. I don’t like commercial made canned soup so I am always making soup. One of the reasons I got the Express pot. It would make cooking dried beans a lot faster. I am looking forward to making beef stock with some neck bones I have in the freezer.

          Your blog is really unique and I enjoy the history and recipes your find. Thanks for all the research you do.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. oooh – I really like the idea of adding back some of the meat. Brilliant! I ended up with soup yesterday instead of broth, it was a cold, rainy day. Oh well!

            Thank you for your kind words! I’m really having fun sharing interesting discoveries with others!

            Liked by 1 person

            1. trkingmomoe says:

              You are welcome.

              Like

  3. Adri says:

    Looks Great!!!!!!!! Have a great day!!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sheryl says:

    This post makes me wish that I had saved the turkey carcass. This sounds easy. I always think that I should use the carcass to make broth – though I believe that I’ve actually only done it once.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      It is something I always do. I even use deli rotisserie chicken carcass for stock. I then have stock in the freezer for recipes and it only cost pennies to do. The family has already gave my new Express Pot a name Rd2d because it sorta looks like it.

      It is always a pleasure to have you stop in. . .

      Like

      1. Sheryl says:

        I really need to do this. Homemade stock is healthier and tastier as well as less expensive.

        Liked by 1 person

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