Pillowcase Edging Pattern

I enjoy making pillowcases and have a cedar chest full of them.  This is one of my current projects.  The pillowcases are more like shams because the embroidery pattern covers the whole case.  I will show you the finished project in a later blog. What I want to do is show you my favorite wide lace edging pattern. I did the lace in this project from memory so it is different from the pictures and pattern that is below.

dscn2889

This pillowcase was made about 20 years ago.  It still looks as good as the day I made it.

About 20 years ago this pattern was in the Magic Crochet magazine. It had a different header in the pattern.  When I say a header that is the term used for the finished edge that is going to be attached to the item.  It can be what is used to crochet the lace to the item or sewed to the item. In the picture below you will see the lace without the header.  And below that is the international pattern.  I found this picture on a pininterest board.   I recognized it because I have used it several times over the years.

e50fa7ecdc201d2f9c06d3b335c3bdc3

You read the pattern from the left of the diagram.

I have written this pattern in USA crochet terms in long hand so it can be translated to other languages.

  1. Start with chain 5, double crochet in the first chain loop twice, chain 3, double crochet 3 times in the same chain as the last 2 double crochet (shell is formed), chain 3 and turn,
  2. 3 double crochet in the chain 3 loop of the shell, chain 3, 3 double crochet in the top of shell (shell formed) chain 5, turn.
  3. Make a shell in the chain 3 loop of the last shell, chain 3 and turn.
  4.  Make a shell in the last shell chain’s 3 space, chain 2, double crochet in last double crochet in shell( see pic), chain 2, double crochet in the 5 chain loop.chain 5, turn.
  5. Double crochet in the first double crochet of the last row, chain 2, double crochet in the next double crochet, chain 2, shell in the next shell’s chain 3 space, chain 3 and turn.
  6. Make a shell in the last shell chain’s 3 space, chain 2, double crochet in the last double crochet in the last row, ( chain 2, double crochet in the next double crochet) twice, chain 2, double crochet in the chain 5 space, chain 5, turn. (There should be 4 spaces on each side of the point.)
  7. Double crochet in the first double crochet of the last row, (chain 2, double crochet in the next double crochet) twice, chain 2, double crochet in the first double crochet of the shell, chain 2, make shell in chain’s 3 space, chain 3, turn.
  8. Make a shell in the last shell chain 3 space, chain 2, double crochet in the last double crochet of the shell, (chain 2, double crochet in the next double crochet,) 4 times, chain 2, double crochet in the last chain 5 space, chain 5, turn. (6 spaces on each side of the point.)
  9. Double crochet in the first double crochet of the last row, (chain 2, double crochet in the next double crochet) 4 times, chain 2, double crochet in the first double crochet of the shell, chain 2, make shell in shell’s chain 3 space, chain 3, turn. (7 spaces on each side of the point,)
  10. Make a shell in chain’s 3 space, chain 4 turn.
  11. Make a shell in chain’s 3 space, chain 3 turn.
  12. Make a shell in chain’s 3 space, chain 5 turn.
  13. Make a shell in chain’s 3 space, chain 3 turn.
  14. Repeat from row 4 to make next point.  Continue until enough point are made.
  15. Using the picture above you can see there is 4 more rows to add.  That picture should help you to figure out the chart. You can copy the picture of the chart into your photo file and enlarge it.  You should then be able to see the symbols better and count stitches. In the last row you will be putting a picot between each double crochet.  You can also finish it with what ever combination of stitches you like.

Here is a partial chart of the international symbols that I found on pininterest to give the all of you that don’t know how to crochet and idea how this pattern is read.

 

fdfe383e5af0983887489771d3dbe0d9

 

Here this lace attached to a recently finished pair of pillowcases.   You can see that the main body is done first in a fillet crochet in the length that is needed. Then the last three colors are added. The pillowcases came from a pre stamped kit with a matching dresser scarf. The embroidery covers the whole pillowcase so it can be used as a sham.

dscn2900

I crocheted a double crochet header on the lace in white and hand sewed it on the pillowcase.dscn2720

I used the same shell pattern and fillet point but only did the first 4 rows for the dresser scarf edging.  I blanket stitched the edging on.  I did not cut the thread to make sure I had enough edging made or if I made too much so I could adjust or add more crocheting.  Then I crocheted the pink on in a single crochet to give the lace a nice finish. This method gives the appearance of the lace being crocheted directly on.

dscn2724

This set will be added to my Etsy store for sale. Janelle’s Cupboard.

Advertisements

16 Comments Add yours

  1. Maxine says:

    This looks beautiful. I imagine the colour changes could be tricky. I love line, and crotchet but have only made a couple of crochet doilies and that was some years ago now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      The color change is not hard. You just need to remember to leave a long tail of thread so you can thread a needle with to work the ends in so they won’t pull out. You gave me an idea for another blog to show how to work in ends of crocheted lace.

      Thanks for your comment.

      Like

      1. Maxine says:

        Thank you for the info and look forward to new post.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. lovely work! I have great respect for you doing hand needlework! I never learned, don’t have the patience required; but do appreciate the effort and work that goes into a hand pieced project of any kind. My grandmothers did something called tatting on the edges of dresser scarves & pillowcases. I have some of my mother in laws pieces and use them all the time. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My peabrain just boggles. ~~dru~~

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Think of it as fiber art. I was a very lonely and bored little girl and women that lived around me did this all the time. I made a point to learn how to fill my time. It was how I entertained myself growing up. It is a skill that I have always been grateful to have. I still entertain myself with it. It can be like therapy at times. I read that the counting and repetition that your brain does while you are knitting or crocheting is effective as meditation.for relieving stress. I figure that must be true because when the going gets tough I do a lot of this.

      As always thanks for the comment.

      Like

  4. Leah says:

    Lovely !! My aunt was a “master of arts” in these, too. I am used to working with graphs and am still relatively unfamiliar with written crochet instructions and differences between US vs UK crochet terms, so thank you for providing such a nice “translation”, it’s a pleasure to learn from you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thank you for your comment.

      Uk treble crochet =Us double crochet

      There are charts you can search for on the internet for that covers the conversion.

      I am working on a pattern right now from Europe off the internet. That makes me aware of all the differences. I thought just writing it out would make the translator work better. I don’t have trouble reading charts but some people do. The lady that taught me to crochet when I was a child would work off of pictures or samples that she had borrowed.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful! What work went into that! I remember my grandmother having beautiful pillow cases with crocheted edges.

    Like

    1. trkingmomoe says:

      Thanks for your comment.

      I enjoy the craft and have been doing it for a long time so it don’t take me as long as others to do it.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. These are stunning wow!!!!

    Like

  7. Sheryl says:

    Beautiful! You are such a skilled artist.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s